Worthless Things

I love it when my daily lectionary readings come together and really punch me in the chest!  This morning’s Psalter reading (from BoC) and Gospel reading (from LSB) did just that…and it was awesome.

In Psalm 119, I read:

Turn my eyes from looking at worthless things;
and give me life in your ways.  (Ps 119.37, ESV)

That line was enough to get and keep me thinking about the worthless things of the world that so often entice us away from what is truly important.  Surely we could all provide a litany of these sorts of things that almost continually threaten to pull our attention away from Christ and his kingdom.  Quite honestly, I was driven to repentance over all the times that I wander, pursuing these worthless things instead of clinging to Christ–and pleaded with God for grace to focus more on him than the world.

Then in Matthew, I read:

Then Jesus was led up by the Spirit into the wilderness to be tempted by the devil.  And after fasting forty days and forty nights, he was hungry.  And the tempter came and said to him, “If you are the Son of God, command these stones to become loaves of bread.”  But he answered, “It is written,

“‘Man shall not live by bread alone,
but by every word that comes from the mouth of God.’”

Then the devil took him to the holy city and set him on the pinnacle of the temple and said to him, “If you are the Son of God, throw yourself down, for it is written,

“‘He will command his angels concerning you,’

and

“‘On their hands they will bear you up,
lest you strike your foot against a stone.’”

Jesus said to him, “Again it is written, ‘You shall not put the Lord your God to the test.’” Again, the devil took him to a very high mountain and showed him all the kingdoms of the world and their glory.  And he said to him, “All these I will give you, if you will fall down and worship me.”  Then Jesus said to him, “Be gone, Satan! For it is written,

“‘You shall worship the Lord your God
and him only shall you serve.’”

Then the devil left him, and behold, angels came and were ministering to him. (Mt 4.1-11, ESV)

No sooner was my prayer uttered than it was answered in this account from the life of Christ!  Here he faced temptation to chase after what are clearly ‘worthless things’:

  • Necessary (but mundane) necessities over which Christ has taught us not to worry
  • Spectacular and miraculous manifestations, which can actually be sinful tests of God
  • Personal glory and honor, which clearly is wrong when sought out, esp. through sinful means

To beat the temptations of these worthless things, Jesus relied continually on the Word of God to focus on the revealed will of God.

Sure, it’s simple.  Sure, we’ve heard this countless times.  Sure, we know these things to be true…

…and yet, like all the blessings of the God in Christ Jesus, we cannot hear these words too often.  Thanks be to God for his grace!

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Historic Moment in Shuttle History

These shots were just emailed around Johnson Space Center this morning.  Having two shuttles on the pad simultaneously hasn’t happened (if my homework is correct) since the early 80’s…and is not likely to happen again in the history of the program.  It’s a beautiful sight!

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Luther on Crying Out to God

In my little corner of the world, there has been much talk recently about calling on God for help in times of trouble.  While many want God to come to their rescue at a moment’s notice, few seem willing to struggle and wrestle in prayer…instead praying haphazardly or ‘as if you’re shouting into the wind.’  “In this case,” Luther says, “it would be better not to pray at all.”  Instead, teaching on Psalm 118, Luther says:

You must learn to call on the Lord.  Don’t sit all alone or lie on the couch, shaking your head and letting your thoughts torture you.  Don’t worry about how to get out of your situation or brood about your terrible life, how miserable you feel, and what a bad person you are.  Instead, say, “Get a grip on yourself, you lazy bum!  Fall on your knees, and raise your hands and eyes toward heaven.  Read a psalm.  Say the Lord’s Prayer, and tearfully tell God what you need.”  This passage [Ps 118.5] teaches us to call on him.  Similarly, David said, “I pour out my complaint before him; before him I tell my trouble” (Ps 142.2).  God wants you to tell him your troubles.  He doesn’t want you to keep them to yourself.  He doesn’t want you to struggle with them all alone and torture yourself.  Doing this will only multiply your troubles.

God knows you will be too weak to overcome your troubles by yourself.  He wants you to grow strong in him.  Then he will be the one who receives the glory.  Out of difficult experiences emerge true Christians.  Without troubles, people talk a lot about faith and the Spirit but don’t really know what these things are or what they’re saying.
(from Faith Alone: A Daily Devotional / LW 14:60)

The point is quite simply this:  In his great mercy, through Christ Jesus, God has provided us:

  • An ear for our complaints
  • Companionship in times of loneliness
  • Strength in times of weakness
  • Perseverance in times of impatience
  • Help when we are overwhelmed
  • Growth in times of struggle
  • Relief in times of inundation

That said, as earthly fathers often restrain themselves from helping their children until asked in order to teach their children trust, reliance, and hope, so our Heavenly Father teaches us to cry out to him in our time of need.  And he will answer us through reassurance from his Word, a gentle word from others, physical aid from others, the peace that surpasses understanding (Phil 4.7), or another means.  Even if he delays, we may continue to hope, knowing that “out of difficult experiences emerge true Christians.”

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What I Did Last Weekend…(More Ike)

I just found this great animation of the radar returns from Ike.  As a point of reference, the very center of this image (i.e., the NWS radar) is located about 1 mile from our house.  While we got hammered by the wind, the line of thunderstorms that blew through the following morning caused the majority of water damage for folks…though thankfully the front dropped the temps about 20 degrees.

Update:  I replaced the graphic with this link on the NWS website because radar loop takes a long time to load, especially if you don’t care to view it!

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Luther on Hurricanes (and Trusting God)

By no deliberate choice of my own, I read the following words from Dr. Luther the morning after Hurricane Ike had ravaged our part of the world between Galveston and Houston.  In fact, while reading this, the wind was still blowing, our roof was still leaking, and shingles occasionally left their happy abode on our roof and drifted to the ground.  Writing on Matthew 6, Luther says:

We can’t seem to let go of our anxieties and worries as long as we live.  Yet God gives us everything we need hour by hour, without needing any assistance from us.  So why do we keep on having foolish fears and anxieties about trivial little needs, as though God can’t or won’t supply us with food and shelter?  We should hang our heads in shame when people point out this foolishness to us.  Yet foolish is the only way to describe those rich, well-fed people who are always worried about having a full pantry.  They have plenty of food on hand to serve nourishing meals, but they never share a meal with anyone or invite dinner guests.  They have empty beds but never ask anyone to spend the night.

Accordingly, Christ is plainly telling us what foolish people we are.  It should be enough to make us want to spit on ourselves in utter disgust.  Still, we continue to grope along in our blindness, even though it’s obvious that we’re incapable of providing for our basic needs without God.  This alone should be enough to make us Christians and to keep this thought in mind: ‘Undoubtedly, I never held in my own hands even one fleeting moment of my life.  If I must trust God for my very life and limb, why should I worry about how I’m going to find nourishment from day to day?’  Not trusting God for our daily needs is like having a wealthy father who is willing to lavish thousands of dollars on us, yet not being able to trust him for money in an emergency.
(from Faith Alone: A Daily Devotional / LW 21:195)

There have been only a few times in my nearly 35 years when I have been totally conscious of my utter dependence upon God “hour by hour” for not only ‘the big things’ but for my very existence.  The evening Ike made landfall and plowed up Galveston Bay was one of those times.  For the span of what seemed like days, the wind howled in anger, rain pounded our house trying (not entirely in vain) to get inside, trees bent over prostrate in deference to the tempest, and shingles beat continually against the roof before their silence betrayed their absence.  The experience was a twelve-hour long total sensory overload intensified by the fact that it all occurred at night, which denied me the ability to see what was happening as it also denied me the ability to sleep for almost 40 hours.

It has been years since I have been acutely aware that, “Undoubtedly, I never held in my own hands even one fleeting moment of my life.”  If you have never been in such a situation, be it from disaster, combat, illness, accident, etc., unfortunately I can neither adequately describe it to you nor can you truly completely comprehend (beyond theological or mental assent) the truth of Luther’s statement.  For those who have been here and returned to the normalcy or ‘new normalcy’ or life post-event, you know exactly what Luther is saying.  Even when losing the entirety of our material possessions, as so many in this area have…or perhaps I should say especially when losing our possessions, we can answer in faith Luther’s rhetorical question, “If I must trust God for my very life and limb, why should I worry about how I’m going to find nourishment from day to day?”  The answer, of course, is quite simply this…in my own words:

I should not worry.  My God, who provides us life and existence from moment to moment will not fail to provide us everything we need.  His provision may not come in ways we expect, ways we are accustomed to, or ways that we necessarily enjoy, but his provision will come.  Of these things we can be sure.  He has proven himself faithful time and time again.

Thanks be to God for his great faithfulness, mercy, and grace in Christ Jesus!

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Post-Ike Update

Wow!  The last week has been a whirlwind (no pun intended) of weather and activity in and around the Houston-Galveston area.  With my family safely tucked away in Lake Charles, LA, I weathered the storm with no major incidents.  Sure, we’ll get a new roof and fence, but all in all, we fared quite well.  No major damage to speak of…we were fortunate.

After the weather cleared on Sunday, I was recalled by by Air National Guard unit (147th Reconnaissance Wing) to begin post-hurricane recovery efforts.  As a unit chaplain, I spent most of the next week visiting with our folks, ensuring they and their families were taken care of, visiting military members working at several area Points of Distribution (PODs), and visiting with folks at the Ellington Field FEMA registration site.  I also had the privilege of meeting President Bush, our Governor, and many other VIPs who have been in the region surveying the damage.  Understandably, stress levels have been high and energy levels low, but after a week, most have started to get into a routine of what will end up being their ‘new normal.’

There is surely much more to write about, but quite frankly, I’m tired too.  More may follow, eventually, but I’m looking forward to catching up with family and friends and getting back to my own new normal.