On Loving Our Neighbors

Loving our neighbors is one of the greatest challenges in both the Old and New Testaments.  Our sinful nature and selfishness make us naturally put ourselves first, in direct contradiction to the command of God.  Added to this, our contemporary American culture and its infatuation with the supremacy of the self has lessened any cultural emphasis on selflessly helping others in need.  Sadly, contemporary American Christianity is following our culture’s emphasis on the infatuation with self and has done little to sound the clarion call to love and serve our neighbors.

Historically, however, this self-centered approach is foreign to a Christ-centered understanding of Christianity (and a conservative approach to Judaism).  Writing on Galatians 5.14, Luther says:

No one should think they fully understand this command: “Love your neighbor.”  Certainly this command is very short and very easy as far as the words are concerned.  But where are the teachers and learners who actually practice this in life?  These words, “Serve one another humbly in love,” and “Love your neighbor as yourself,” are eternal words.  No one can think about, urge, and practice them enough.

Tuesday and Wednesday, I had the wonderful opportunity to head to Galveston with several other members of the Texas Air National Guard and help serve lunches at Moody Memorial UMC.  The church, together with Lighthouse Charities, has been preparing and serving lunches free of charge to anyone in town since folks were let back on the island after Ike.  Though we still have a ‘blue roof’ and much of our fence blown down in the back yard, our lives have largely returned to pre-storm normal.  Going to Galveston, however, I was reminded that a great number of people will be feeling the effects of Ike will be felt for many, many months to come.  This was my first post-Ike trip to Galveston and the devastation, though expected in my mind, was still shocking.  As resiliant as folks on the island are, it will still be a long, long time until life settles into a “new normal.”  Until then, as everyday if we will simply look around, there are countless opportunities to love and serve our neighbors…if we will only practice the words we know so well.

A new friend, Randall, going through the damage in Galveston after Ike.

 

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Luther on God’s Ways

Anyone who has been a believer for any time at all will soon come to a point in life where they simply wonder why God has acted the way he has or allowed things to play out the way they did.  I suppose there is comfort in knowing that, “Why?” is one of the universal questions of the Christian life.  Luther says:

God leads and directs his people in mysterious ways.  In the Bible, we read, “Your path led through the sea, your way through the mighty waters, though your footprints were not seen” (Ps 77.19).  Christ himself told Peter, “You do not realize now what I am doing, but later you will understand” (Jn 13.7).  Christ seems to be saying, “You want to see me and want me to do what seems good and right to you.  But I will act in a way that will make you think I’m a fool rather than God.  You will see my back, not my face.  You won’t understand what I’m doing or why I’m doing it.  Then I’ll be able to mold you and remold you the way I would like.  My methods may appear as foolish to you as if they were from the devil himself.”

We need to learn how God guides his people as they grow and develop.  I too have often tried to dictate to our Lord God a certain way in which I expect him to run things.  I have often said, “O Lord, would you please do it this way and make it come out that way?”  But God did just the opposite, even though I said to myself, “This is a good suggestion that will bring honor to God and expand his kingdom.”  Undoubtedly, God must have laughed at my so-called wisdom and said, “All right, I know that you are an intelligent, educated person, but I never needed a Peter, a Luther, or anyone else to teach, inform, rule, or guide me.  I am not a God who will allow himself to be taught or directed by others.  Rather, I am the one who leads, rules, and teaches people.”
(from Faith Alone: A Daily Devotional / LW 7:103)

Oh, how often have I prayed in this way?!  “God, please make this happen in just this way…”  Why must I need reminding that my seeming intellect is foolishness in the sight of an omnipotent God?  There is some consolation that, just as God never needs me to enlighten him, so too he “never needed a Peter, a Luther, or anyone else.”  At least if I’m getting a great lesson in humility, I can enjoy good company!

In all seriousness, when events play out exactly opposite of the way they think, why do I question God, his goodness, or his wisdom?  Should I not be reminded that even Job, who was “blameless and upright…who feared God and turned away from evil” (Job 1.1) did not receive an answer when he asked God, “Why?”  What should I, a much greater sinner, expect when asking the same question?  Should we not be reminded that God has said, “As the heavens are higher than the earth, so are my ways higher than your ways and my thoughts than your thoughts” (Is 55.9, ESV)?  There are times when I need to be reminded more personally that God has spoken these words to me, “So are my ways higher than T.C.’s ways and my thoughts than T.C.’s thoughts.”  As much as anyone, I need to be reminded that those pieces of paper on the wall that the world puts so much faith in are really laughable in the wisdom and sight of God…

True wisdom comes not from education or the reading of many books (or blogs!) but from humbly walking with Christ Jesus our Lord.

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Luther on Hard Questions

One of the areas I wrestled with most over my years in Reformed theology was its insistence on not only asking but attempting to answer some very ‘hard questions’ about God, his will, and his ways.  As much as the hidden will of God was discussed, there was always lots and lots of speculation about the hidden things of God, especially among contemporary Reformed types.  For example, these often unanswerable questions are invariably raised in discussions about the Fall (Gen 3).  As usual, Luther brings his wise counsel to the table:

This passage (Gen 3) raises a lot of questions.  Some people become curious and ask, “Well, why did God permit Satan to lute Eve into sin?  Why did Satan appear to Eve in the form of a serpent instead of some other animal?”

No one can explain why God permits things to happen.  No one understands what he does or why he does it.  So we should remember the lesson that Job learned: no one can summon God into court to account for what he does or allows to happen.  We might as well argue with him about why the grass and trees aren’t green all year long.  It’s enough for us to know that all these things are under God’s power.  He can do as he pleases.  Idle curiosity causes guessing and questioning…

As much as there is still a part of me that wants to answer these sorts of difficult “Why?” questions to vainly prove my mastery of theology and philosophy (read with a great dose of sarcasm), I’m reminded by my son that “Why?” is often an immature response to situations we dislike.  Very rarely, even (or perhaps especially) in the area of theology, do we attempt to ask and answer “Why?” questions out of a spirit of humility and childlike wonder.  Instead, we concoct great speculations which often serve only to puff up.

Added to this, in times of great personal tragedy, there really is no good pastoral answer to the question of “Why?”  Then is not the time to speculate on the mysteries of Providence.  Instead, it is the time to grieve and pray with our hurting brothers and sisters in Christ.  “No one can explain why God permits things to happen,” Luther writes.  We can, however, surely know how God feels about us, his children–one glance at the cross yields the unmistakable answer!  Amen.

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