“Scripture Does Not Speak of Christ” by Pr. Peters

Our understanding of the Word of God (especially with respect to its reading as part of liturgy, public worship, and private devotion)  is absolutely paramount to our theology of worship, both corporate and private.  I have never read a short piece on the theology of the Word that is as succinct yet robust as this one by Pr. Peters on his Pastoral Meanderings blog.  I have republished this post below in its entirety, but please let the reader be reminded, these are Pr. Peter’s words and not my own…I emphasize that lest anyone give me any credit for this magnificent piece:

Scott Hahn, former Presbyterian now Roman Catholic, made the relevant point that Scripture does not speak of Christ but speaks Christ. Now this is not argument over terminology or semantics. This is the essential catholic confession — the Word of God does not speak of something the way, for example, I may speak of something I know or have an opinion about. Scripture is God speaking. When Scripture speaks, we hear the voice of God.

For most of Protestantism Scripture has become a book of rules to be followed, a set of principles to inform how we reshape the world, a set of practical tools to better your life, or a road map to lead you from here to eternity. But that is just plain wrong. Scripture is the voice of God. Scripture is the discourse of God in human words. This Word is powerful and can do what it claims and keep all its promises. This Word has the power to call and gather the Church.

On Sunday morning we often treat the Word of God as if it were nothing more than a book of wise sayings, some of which may be practical enough and pointed enough to make a small difference in the ordinary and mundane of our world. We treat so casually what is essentially the Voice of God who speaks to us and is speaking to us in Scripture.

We act as if the gems of Bible study were the hints or conclusions reached from that study — like a school child reads the encyclopedia for things he or she can use in a paper that is due tomorrow. Bible study is important because it is time with God, it is the conversation in which God is the speaker to us and we who have ears tuned in faith can hear Him speaking. It is not what we learn from Bible study but what we learn in Bible study as a people gather to hear every word and as a people who know that this every word is important.

Nowhere is that more true than in worship — the Word of God predominates not because we have found it useful but because it is Christ speaking to us. In this respect liturgy is the first real context for us to hear Scripture — everything else flows from this assembly and is not in competition with it or can substitute for it — as it was for those who heard Scripture first from the voice of the apostles.

This is what we need to rediscover – the urgency, the immediacy of God’s voice in our midst. In response to that voice, we come, we listen, we hear, and we grow. The distasteful practice of cell phones and watch alarms going off in worship is a sign that we have not understood that Scripture is God’s voice speaking to us — or surely we would shut those things off. The strange practice of people moving in and out of the Sanctuary as the Scriptures are read and preached is a sign that we do not understand that Scripture is God’s living voice speaking to us or we would find a way to fit our bathroom needs around this holy and momentous conversation in which God is the speaker and initiates the dialog that brings forth faith in us and bestows upon us all the gifts of the cross and empty tomb.

Instead of burying our faces in bulletins to read, we would raise our heads to listen. I am convinced that the reading of Scripture is heard differently than the reading of Scripture from a service folder page. We don’t listen to each other with our heads buried in a booklet. We listen to each other by looking at the point where the voice is coming from and by learning to tune out the distractions so that we might hear what is said. This is the discipline that is so missing on Sunday morning.

All because we think of Scripture as a vehicle that delivers something to us instead of the thing that is delivered — the voice of God speaking grace and mercy, conviction and condemnation, redemption and restoration, death and life… Wisdom!! Attend!!

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Review: Glo bible software

Glo is bible software like you’ve never seen or experienced. Period.

As Nelson Saba, co-founder of the Glo project has put it, Glo is the bible “re-imagined for a digital world.”

In my more verbose words, Glo is a revolutionary piece of bible study software that makes use of a variety of stunning media to immerse users in God’s word like never before!  After just over a month of using the software…

System Requirements and Installation

The system requirements for Glo are pretty straightforward and typical for recently released software.  They are, according to the Glo website:

  • Microsoft Windows® XP, Vista®, or Windows 7 OS with lastest service pack installed
  • An internet connection
  • At least 18GB of free hard disk space
  • Dual Core Processor
  • 1GB RAM for Microsoft Windows XP, or 2GB RAM for Vista or Windows 7
  • ATI or NVIDIA video graphics card with Microsoft DirectX 9 support
  • DVD Rom Drive

I attempted to install Glo on two different systems with varying success.  The first system I tried was my older 2.0 GHz AMD system with 3 GB of RAM and Win XP.  Though not a dual core processor, Glo installed and ran with no problems whatsoever.  Some of the intense multimedia aspects of Glo bog the system down some (zooming around on maps and playing HD video), but it is nonetheless very usable.  I also tried to install Glo on a 2.5 GHz dual core system with 2 GB of RAM and Win XP with no success.  Immediately after selecting the option to install Glo, the software repeatedly hung up.  There is no telling whether or not there is something quirky with this particular machine or not…did anyone else have problems installing Glo?

Once started, the installation process itself takes a LONG time.  It took well over two hours to install completely, but given that Glo is installing over 3.5 hrs of HD video, over 2300 hi-res photos, over 550 virtual tours, and over 140 hi-res zoomable maps, it isn’t surprising.  Still, it seemed to take longer to install than in actually did because I wanted to dive in and use it!  Patience, friends.  Sit back and read some Job while you’re waiting (grin).

User Interface

The Glo interface is simple, intuitive, and visually appealing.  Everything in the program centers around Bible, Atlas, Timeline, Media, and Topical ‘lenses,’ which makes navigation and use very easy.  Perhaps the best way to describe the interface is just to demonstrate it:

The Experience

In short, Glo is incredible.  Of all the bible study software I regularly use, including Logos and Bibleworks, Glo is the only one that made my thirteen year-old daughter stop and ask, “What’s that?”  More than just stopping, she soon became engrossed with the pictures, videos, and maps that Glo offers.  I’m no expert, but if Glo can captivate a teenage girl and get her involved in bible study, I would call that a resounding success!

As great as this software is, however, there is still room for improvement, especially in the area of searches.  Glo comes with both NIV and KJV bibles (additional bibles are forthcoming, I believe), but there is no way to select only one or the other as part of a search.  Additionally, search results come back from both versions in no particular order (certainly not canonical order).  At first I tried to discern whether some sort of relevance aspect might be in use, but even one-word searches come back in seemingly random order.  In my mind, this quirk keeps me from being able to recommend Glo as one’s only bible study software.  If you know what passages you want to study, Glo is incredible, but if you need the ability to do even simple searches, Glo will frustrate you.  I hope future updates will address this problem.

I mentioned above that my computer is older and not the fastest in the world.  I would really like to try out Glo on a high-end computer system sometime and see how well it performs.  As I said, the lag I experience is a bit annoying but nothing I blame on the software and nothing that keeps it from being completely usable.

Conclusion

As I’ve said throughout, Glo is an amazing piece of software.  The media included in it is unmatched by any other tool I have ever used.  While the search capabilities are not robust enough for me to use as my only bible study software, the media alone is reason enough to recommend Glo to anyone.  If you have any Christmas money lying around that you weren’t sure what to do with, I’d definitely recommend this software.  I hope the Glo team will continue to refine this wonderful software and make it even better.  My thanks to Ken Keim of the Glo support team who was kind enough to send me a copy of Glo to review.

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My Personal Psalter Project

The Psalms have always been central to the worship, liturgies, prayers, devotions, and songs of countless Christians across the centuries.  In the Psalter one can find cries of joy and pain, brokenness and rage, helplessness and confidence.  In other words, the voices in the Psalms are real, very real, and in their heart-felt transparency lies a great deal of their popularity and importance.  They teach us how to pray, how to grieve, how to rejoice–i.e., how to live as believers in the real world with its ups and down.

Here’s how Luther more eloquently summed up the great value of the Psalms in the believer’s life:

Every Christian who would abound in prayer and piety ought, in all reason, to make the Psalter his manual; and, moreover, it were well if every Christian so used it and were so expert in it as to have it word for word by heart, and could have it even in his heart as often as he chanced to be called to speak or act, that he might be able to draw forth or employ some sentence out of it, by way of a proverb. For indeed the truth is, that everything that a pious heart can desire to ask in prayer, it here finds Psalms and words to match, so aptly and sweetly, that no man—no, nor all the men in the world—shall be able to devise forms of words so good and devout. (from Luther’s 1545 Preface to the Psalter)

I love to read from the Psalms each day, but still I long to be more familiar with them than I am.  With this in mind, I began my Personal Psalter Project earlier this week.  I purchased a Moleskine notebook and have begun copying, by hand, one Psalm per day until I have copied all 150.  I am copying them from the New Living Translation, which is my favorite translation, but am taking advantage of the luxury of a single-column setup to take advantage of my own formatting, using different levels of indention to really make the parallelism stand out (similar to what is done in the excellent Psalter layout in God’s Word translation).  In addition, the extra space gives me room to make notes about Hebrew/LXX vocabulary, alternate translations, or personal thoughts.

I will post additional thoughts, as well as some pictures, as this project continues.

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Korah — Throwaway Lives?

With our Ethiopian adoption underway, I’ve begun researching and reading about this ancient nation–its Christianity, its heritage, its history, its people, its politics, etc.  I want to know whence our children will come and a bit of their background.  In so doing, I’ve come across recent blog posts by Michael Halcomb and Xavier Pacheco on the Ethiopian city of Korah.  As the title here indicates, Korah is a city of outcasts–lepers, prostitutes, orphans, HIV/AIDS sufferers, and others–75,000 people who live on the trash discarded by the nearly 2.7 million other residents of Addis Ababa.

In other words, Korah is seventy-five thousand people who have, themselves, literally been thrown away by society.

I encourage you to visit the Help Korah blog to prayerfully read and think how we, as the body of Christ, might come together, pool our resources, and address this horrific situation and others like it elsewhere in the world.  I am still mulling this over and trying to fully grasp the reality of the situation these many people find themselves in everyday–I will definitely be writing more on this later.

Let me leave you with two videos from Michael and Xavier.

  • Watch them
    • See the poverty like you’ve never imagined
    • See the smiles on these people’s faces
    • See the hope offered by those who have realized the need
    • Let your heart be broken
  • Forward them to others
    • Friends and family
    • Brother and sisters in Christ
    • Co-workers
    • Anyone
  • Let’s make a difference

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