Search me, O God, and know my heart;
Test me and know my anxious thoughts.
Point out anything in me that offends you,
And lead me along the path of everlasting life.

— Psalm 139.23-24 (NLT)
Advertisements

Let us leave a little room for reflection in our lives, room too for silence Let us look within ourselves and see whether there is some delightful hidden place inside where we can be free of noise and argument Let us hear the Word of God in stillness and perhaps we will then come to understand it.

— St. Augustine, quoted in Common Prayer

Therefore, Christian nonviolence is not a strategy to end war, though of course it certainly wants to make war less likely. Rather Christians are called to nonviolence in a world of war because they can do nothing less as faithful followers of Christ. Christian nonviolence is an eschatological position that reminds Christians that we live in a new age begun by Christ yet not yet consummated. Accordingly, Christian nonviolence is the exemplification of God’s patience as found in the cross to redeem us so that we might be for the world his promised people.

Stanley Hauerwas, Christological Pacifism

We are called to be contemplatives in the heart of all the world—by seeking the face of God in everything, everyone, everywhere, all the time, and his hand in every happening; seeing and adoring the presence of Jesus, especially in the lowly appearance of bread, and in the distressing disguise of the poor.

— Mother Teresa

The Blessing of Discomfort

I found this great post from Michael Hyatt while clearing out my Instapaper inbox today.  He cites a benediction forwarded to him by his wife.

To describe it as counter-cultural is an understatement.  It’s revolutionary.

May God bless you with discomfort

At easy answers, half-truths, and superficial relationships,

So that you may live deep within your heart.

May God bless you with anger

At injustice, oppression and exploitation of people,

So that you may work for justice, freedom and peace.

May God bless you with tears

To shed for those who suffer pain, rejection, hunger, and war,

So that you may reach out your hand to comfort them

And turn their pain into joy.

And may God bless you with enough foolishness

To believe that you can make a difference in the world,

So that you can do what others claim cannot be done

To bring justice and kindness to all our children and the poor.

Amen

Can you imagine a world of Christians receiving this blessing…and then acting on it?  A continent?  A nation?  A congregation?  It would change the world.