making changes…

It’s been a while since I’ve written consistently here at Taking Thoughts Captive.  After my last few posts I deliberately took some time off from writing to figure out how to implement some of the ideas I’ve been writing about at simply, Christian.  I considered many things, including:

  • not blogging anymore at all…let’s be honest, it takes a lot of time and effort
  • switching to a Tumblr blog to force me to focus on more concise posts
  • changing exclusively to a photoblog…as a visual person a picture is worth many, many words

None of those ideas really sat well with me. I like to write. I like to interact. I like to share my ideas with others. At the same time, part of simple Christian living means making good on my desire to cut back on the time I spend online–both reading and writing–in order to spend more time with family, more time focusing on others, more time changing the world, etc.

With these ideas in mind, here is how I plan to implement those ideas…here is what you can expect as I continue to write here:

  • more links to others’ blogs…there are a lot of GREAT writers out there, no sense reinventing the wheel here
  • more links to causes…I’ve been remiss lately in pointing us to how/where we can make a real difference
  • more ‘simple thoughts’…well-worded, concise quotes that speak volumes beyond their word counts
  • more photos…as they speak for themselves
  • fewer book reviews…plenty of folks are writing plenty of reviews and, honestly, it’s gotten to be a chore

If it looks like the same focus I’m trying to implement at simply, Christian, you’re right.  I hope you’ll like my new focus.  Of course, if you don’t, you’re free to move along.

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simply, Christian (a new project)…or where have I been?

My absence around here has been extended, and I’m not apologizing because I’ve started working on something that really excites me–a new website/blog titled, simply, Christian.  Here’s what it’s all about:

simply, Christian is about choosing to live simply in midst of busyness in order to free our time, resources, and desires that we might focus on what is truly important and simply live.

It is about taking seriously Jesus’ world-changing, life-redeeming good news to address not only people’s spiritual condition but also their physical condition.  It is about daring ourselves to address the most pressing calamities that face humanity today in order to bring real, lasting transformation to others’ lives.  It is about making small changes in our daily activities that we might bring large changes to others, especially those…

  • who are orphans
  • who are affected by disease, especially HIV/AIDS and malaria
  • who lack clean water
  • who have not been shown mercy

It is about challenging one another to live simply, Christian.

My name is T.C. Judd, and these are my thoughts.  Of late, my life has been dramatically impacted in two completely different ways by two completely different writers.  With respect to simplicity, Leo Babauta of Zen Habits (and more recently, Everett Bogue of Far Beyond the Stars) has helped me to see the clutter and chaos that fills much of life and has challenged me to simplify.  With respect to living the whole of the Christian life, Richard Stearns, in The Hole in Our Gospel, brought to my attention the immensity of the social crises facing our world today and challenged me to make a difference.  Over time, I realized that the two blended well together–truly living a simple life (not a minimalist one, in my case) as a vehicle for truly living a Christian life.

So that, in a nutshell,  is what it is to live simply, Christian.

I’d appreciate if you’d head over to simply, Christian and check things out over there.  I’ll still be blogging here, though I expect the pace to remain slow for a while until I’ve gathered some momentum.

Korah — Throwaway Lives?

With our Ethiopian adoption underway, I’ve begun researching and reading about this ancient nation–its Christianity, its heritage, its history, its people, its politics, etc.  I want to know whence our children will come and a bit of their background.  In so doing, I’ve come across recent blog posts by Michael Halcomb and Xavier Pacheco on the Ethiopian city of Korah.  As the title here indicates, Korah is a city of outcasts–lepers, prostitutes, orphans, HIV/AIDS sufferers, and others–75,000 people who live on the trash discarded by the nearly 2.7 million other residents of Addis Ababa.

In other words, Korah is seventy-five thousand people who have, themselves, literally been thrown away by society.

I encourage you to visit the Help Korah blog to prayerfully read and think how we, as the body of Christ, might come together, pool our resources, and address this horrific situation and others like it elsewhere in the world.  I am still mulling this over and trying to fully grasp the reality of the situation these many people find themselves in everyday–I will definitely be writing more on this later.

Let me leave you with two videos from Michael and Xavier.

  • Watch them
    • See the poverty like you’ve never imagined
    • See the smiles on these people’s faces
    • See the hope offered by those who have realized the need
    • Let your heart be broken
  • Forward them to others
    • Friends and family
    • Brother and sisters in Christ
    • Co-workers
    • Anyone
  • Let’s make a difference

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“The Blind Side” — Reflections on Adoption

Yesterday, we enjoyed our first free weekend afternoon in December by heading to the theater to see “The Blind Side.”  In case you are unfamiliar with the story, as I was before yesterday, here’s the summary from the movie’s website:

Teenager Michael Oher is surviving on his own, virtually homeless, when he is spotted on the street by Leigh Anne Tuohy.  Learning that the young man is one of her daughter’s classmates, Leigh Anne insists that Michael–wearing shorts and a t-shirt in the dead of winter–come out of the cold.  Without a moment’s hesitation, she invites him to stay at the Tuohy home for the night.  What starts out as a gesture of kindness turns into something more as Michael becomes part of the Tuohy family despite the differences in their backgrounds.

Through the course of the story (i.e., Oher’s real life), Michael journeys from a violent, drug-wracked upbringing — where he was in-and-out of the foster care system, attended eleven different schools in nine years, and entered his sophomore year of high school with a 0.6 GPA — to an All-American college football player for Ole Miss and a 2009 NFL first-round draft pick for the Baltimore Ravens.

Perhaps the best short summary is the movie’s trailer itself:

As I sat there in the dark, one hand holding the hand of my 13 year-old daughter and the other holding my 5 year-old son in my lap, the impact of this movie hit home like a freight train…in two ways.

For starters, our daughter has no real grasp of the reality behind the drug and poverty-related violence and lifestyle portrayed in Oher’s upbringing.  Talking about the movie afterward, I realized she had no idea that people lived in very similar circumstances only a few miles from our home.  While she knows intellectually about such things, she has (fortunately) never experienced them first-hand and didn’t really understand how physically close to home such suffering, pain, and hardship really exists.

In addition to my daughter’s epiphany, seeing the violence toward the end of the movie where many of Oher’s acquaintances are gunned down in various drug-related shootings made me hold on to my son even tighter.  In case you didn’t know, we adopted our son from Ukraine in 2007, just over two years ago.  Statistically speaking, like Michael Oher, if our son had stayed where he was, he didn’t stand a chance.  To put it into perspective, here are the statistics (from here):

  • Ukrainian orphans typically grow up in large state-run homes, which may house over 200 children.
  • Many children run away from these homes, preferring to live on the street.
  • Children usually graduate from these institutions between 15 and 16 years old and are turned out, unprepared for life outside the home.
  • About 10% of them will commit suicide after leaving the orphanage before their 18th birthday.
  • 60% of the girls will end up in prostitution. Those who run prostitution rings target orphaned girls, who are especially vulnerable due to their lack of options and lack of people who care what happens to them. Though promised good jobs, they end up on the streets and brothels of cities across Europe.
  • 70% of the boys will enter a life of crime. Many of these will die young of violence or end up in prison. Most inmates contract TB in prison.

The point of these statistics isn’t to pat ourselves on the back for doing something so noble as adopting, far from it.  The point is this:  there are hundreds of millions of children around the world just like Michael Oher and our son.  Some of them live five miles away, some of them live thousands of miles away.

How can we help them?  How could we possibly not?

(photo from https://www.4orphans.com)

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Questions on the Economy and the Bailout

OK, I need help understanding the current state of the economy and how the proposed bailout will help make things better.  Once again I freely admit to being an engineer and a theologian, not a politician nor an economist…with that in mind, I have been mulling over the following thoughts and am looking for an education.  Here goes:

First, my summary of the present economic situation:

  1. Both the original and current bailout plans have been all about jump-starting the economy by jump-starting the credit market in one way or another
  2. A major contributor to the economic mess is Americans living well beyond their means and wracking up huge amounts of credit debt (either via ARMs or credit cards) on which many are finding it impossible to make payments (esp. ARMs)
  3. A consequence of the current mess is that creditors are unable to continue lending money (despite the fact that I’m still getting multiple credit card offers in the mail each week)
  4. Since lendors cannot lend, consumers cannot consume…end result, the economy slows

Now, my understanding of the proposed solution:

  1. Dumping $700 billion + into various areas of our financial system will allow banks, etc. to begin offering credit and lending opportunities again
  2. Increased lending and credit will allow consumers to increase spending, reviving the slowed economy

Assuming my understanding of the problem and proposed solution is correct, I have two questions, that I hope someone can answer:

  1. How will extending additional credit to people who are presently unable to pay off the debt they owe provide a long-term fix to the economy?  Won’t this actually make things worse in the long run when they are then unable to make payments on a larger amount of debt?
  2. Philosophically, isn’t the whole idea of economic growth through the encouragement of our citizens to bear increased levels of debt irresponsible and/or immoral, especially given the fact that this crisis was caused or at least worsened by people defaulting on current debts?

I’m having a really hard time understanding how the proposed bailout plan is anything other than a poorly crafted band-aid fix that will ultimately leave us worse off than we are now.  Please, will someone with some economic and political savvy provide understandable answers to my questions?

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What I Did Last Weekend…(More Ike)

I just found this great animation of the radar returns from Ike.  As a point of reference, the very center of this image (i.e., the NWS radar) is located about 1 mile from our house.  While we got hammered by the wind, the line of thunderstorms that blew through the following morning caused the majority of water damage for folks…though thankfully the front dropped the temps about 20 degrees.

Update:  I replaced the graphic with this link on the NWS website because radar loop takes a long time to load, especially if you don’t care to view it!

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Luther on Hurricanes (and Trusting God)

By no deliberate choice of my own, I read the following words from Dr. Luther the morning after Hurricane Ike had ravaged our part of the world between Galveston and Houston.  In fact, while reading this, the wind was still blowing, our roof was still leaking, and shingles occasionally left their happy abode on our roof and drifted to the ground.  Writing on Matthew 6, Luther says:

We can’t seem to let go of our anxieties and worries as long as we live.  Yet God gives us everything we need hour by hour, without needing any assistance from us.  So why do we keep on having foolish fears and anxieties about trivial little needs, as though God can’t or won’t supply us with food and shelter?  We should hang our heads in shame when people point out this foolishness to us.  Yet foolish is the only way to describe those rich, well-fed people who are always worried about having a full pantry.  They have plenty of food on hand to serve nourishing meals, but they never share a meal with anyone or invite dinner guests.  They have empty beds but never ask anyone to spend the night.

Accordingly, Christ is plainly telling us what foolish people we are.  It should be enough to make us want to spit on ourselves in utter disgust.  Still, we continue to grope along in our blindness, even though it’s obvious that we’re incapable of providing for our basic needs without God.  This alone should be enough to make us Christians and to keep this thought in mind: ‘Undoubtedly, I never held in my own hands even one fleeting moment of my life.  If I must trust God for my very life and limb, why should I worry about how I’m going to find nourishment from day to day?’  Not trusting God for our daily needs is like having a wealthy father who is willing to lavish thousands of dollars on us, yet not being able to trust him for money in an emergency.
(from Faith Alone: A Daily Devotional / LW 21:195)

There have been only a few times in my nearly 35 years when I have been totally conscious of my utter dependence upon God “hour by hour” for not only ‘the big things’ but for my very existence.  The evening Ike made landfall and plowed up Galveston Bay was one of those times.  For the span of what seemed like days, the wind howled in anger, rain pounded our house trying (not entirely in vain) to get inside, trees bent over prostrate in deference to the tempest, and shingles beat continually against the roof before their silence betrayed their absence.  The experience was a twelve-hour long total sensory overload intensified by the fact that it all occurred at night, which denied me the ability to see what was happening as it also denied me the ability to sleep for almost 40 hours.

It has been years since I have been acutely aware that, “Undoubtedly, I never held in my own hands even one fleeting moment of my life.”  If you have never been in such a situation, be it from disaster, combat, illness, accident, etc., unfortunately I can neither adequately describe it to you nor can you truly completely comprehend (beyond theological or mental assent) the truth of Luther’s statement.  For those who have been here and returned to the normalcy or ‘new normalcy’ or life post-event, you know exactly what Luther is saying.  Even when losing the entirety of our material possessions, as so many in this area have…or perhaps I should say especially when losing our possessions, we can answer in faith Luther’s rhetorical question, “If I must trust God for my very life and limb, why should I worry about how I’m going to find nourishment from day to day?”  The answer, of course, is quite simply this…in my own words:

I should not worry.  My God, who provides us life and existence from moment to moment will not fail to provide us everything we need.  His provision may not come in ways we expect, ways we are accustomed to, or ways that we necessarily enjoy, but his provision will come.  Of these things we can be sure.  He has proven himself faithful time and time again.

Thanks be to God for his great faithfulness, mercy, and grace in Christ Jesus!

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