“Scripture Does Not Speak of Christ” by Pr. Peters

Our understanding of the Word of God (especially with respect to its reading as part of liturgy, public worship, and private devotion)  is absolutely paramount to our theology of worship, both corporate and private.  I have never read a short piece on the theology of the Word that is as succinct yet robust as this one by Pr. Peters on his Pastoral Meanderings blog.  I have republished this post below in its entirety, but please let the reader be reminded, these are Pr. Peter’s words and not my own…I emphasize that lest anyone give me any credit for this magnificent piece:

Scott Hahn, former Presbyterian now Roman Catholic, made the relevant point that Scripture does not speak of Christ but speaks Christ. Now this is not argument over terminology or semantics. This is the essential catholic confession — the Word of God does not speak of something the way, for example, I may speak of something I know or have an opinion about. Scripture is God speaking. When Scripture speaks, we hear the voice of God.

For most of Protestantism Scripture has become a book of rules to be followed, a set of principles to inform how we reshape the world, a set of practical tools to better your life, or a road map to lead you from here to eternity. But that is just plain wrong. Scripture is the voice of God. Scripture is the discourse of God in human words. This Word is powerful and can do what it claims and keep all its promises. This Word has the power to call and gather the Church.

On Sunday morning we often treat the Word of God as if it were nothing more than a book of wise sayings, some of which may be practical enough and pointed enough to make a small difference in the ordinary and mundane of our world. We treat so casually what is essentially the Voice of God who speaks to us and is speaking to us in Scripture.

We act as if the gems of Bible study were the hints or conclusions reached from that study — like a school child reads the encyclopedia for things he or she can use in a paper that is due tomorrow. Bible study is important because it is time with God, it is the conversation in which God is the speaker to us and we who have ears tuned in faith can hear Him speaking. It is not what we learn from Bible study but what we learn in Bible study as a people gather to hear every word and as a people who know that this every word is important.

Nowhere is that more true than in worship — the Word of God predominates not because we have found it useful but because it is Christ speaking to us. In this respect liturgy is the first real context for us to hear Scripture — everything else flows from this assembly and is not in competition with it or can substitute for it — as it was for those who heard Scripture first from the voice of the apostles.

This is what we need to rediscover – the urgency, the immediacy of God’s voice in our midst. In response to that voice, we come, we listen, we hear, and we grow. The distasteful practice of cell phones and watch alarms going off in worship is a sign that we have not understood that Scripture is God’s voice speaking to us — or surely we would shut those things off. The strange practice of people moving in and out of the Sanctuary as the Scriptures are read and preached is a sign that we do not understand that Scripture is God’s living voice speaking to us or we would find a way to fit our bathroom needs around this holy and momentous conversation in which God is the speaker and initiates the dialog that brings forth faith in us and bestows upon us all the gifts of the cross and empty tomb.

Instead of burying our faces in bulletins to read, we would raise our heads to listen. I am convinced that the reading of Scripture is heard differently than the reading of Scripture from a service folder page. We don’t listen to each other with our heads buried in a booklet. We listen to each other by looking at the point where the voice is coming from and by learning to tune out the distractions so that we might hear what is said. This is the discipline that is so missing on Sunday morning.

All because we think of Scripture as a vehicle that delivers something to us instead of the thing that is delivered — the voice of God speaking grace and mercy, conviction and condemnation, redemption and restoration, death and life… Wisdom!! Attend!!

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Luther on Testing God

On the subject of testing God, Luther writes:

Deuteronomy 6 teaches us to trust that God will take care of us in good and bad times.  We shouldn’t become overconfident in times of plenty, but we also need to patiently endure times of adversity.  God will never leave us.  He will be near us in our troubles.  Unbelievers don’t have this confidence in God, because they put their trust in earthly things.

If what we need isn’t available to us, we have to rely on God’s promises.  If we don’t rely on God, we are testing him.  This is what Moses was writing about when he said, “as you did at Massah.”  At Massah, Israel complained and asked, “Is the LORD among us or not?” (Ex 17.7).  The people didn’t trust God’s promises because he didn’t fulfill them in the time, place, or manner they expected.  Therefore, they gave up and stopped believing.  When we try to dictate to God the time, place, and manner for him to act, we are testing him.  At the same time, we’re trying to see if he is really there.  When we do this we are putting limits on God and trying to make him do what we want.  It’s nothing less than trying to deprive God of his divinity.  But we must realize that God is free–not subject to any limitations.  He must dictate to us the place, manner, and time that he will act.
(from Faith Alone: A Daily Devotional / LW 9:74)

When we talk, think, and write about testing God, we generally think along the same lines Luther discusses here.  At the same time, however, we usually fail to draw the conclusion that Luther rightly draws.  “If what we need isn’t available to us, we have to rely on God’s promises.  If we don’t rely on God, we are testing him” (emphasis mine).

In other words, testing God and/by relying on ourselves is, at its core, a manifestation of the sin of unbelief.  We usurp God’s throne, make ourselves out to be God, and attempt to take control because we do not trust God…we do not believe as we ought.

“I believe; help my unbelief!” (Mk 9.24, ESV)

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An Advent Prayer, Week 4

ALMIGHTY God, give us grace that we may cast away the works of darkness, and put upon us the armour of light, now in the time of this mortal life, in which thy Son Jesus Christ came to visit us in great humility; that in the last day, when he shall come again in his glorious majesty to judge both the quick and the dead, we may rise to the life immortal, through him who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Ghost, now and ever. Amen. (from The Book of Common Prayer, 1928 ed.)

An Advent Prayer, Week 3

Eternal God,
you sent John the Baptist
to prepare the way for the coming of your Son.
Grant us the wisdom to hear your will,
that we too may prepare the way for Christ
who is coming in power and glory
to establish his kingdom of peace and justice;
through Jesus Christ our Judge and our Redeemer,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, forever.  Amen.  (from Book of Common Worship, WJK, 1993)

An Advent Prayer, Week 2

Blessed Lord, which hast caused all holy Scriptures to bee written for our learnyng; graunte us that we maye in suche wise heare them, read, marke, learne, and inwardly digeste them; that by pacience, and coumfort of thy holy woorde, we may embrace, and ever holde fast the blessed hope of everlasting life, which thou hast geven us in our saviour Jesus Christe. (from The Book of Common Prayer, 1549 ed.)

Blessed Lord, who has caused all Holy Scriptures to be written for our learning; grant us that we may in such a manner hear them, read, heed, learn, and inwardly digest them; that by patience, and comfort of your Holy Word, we may embrace, and ever hold fast the blessed hope of everlasting life, which you have given us in our Savior Jesus Christ. (my own moderization)